Public supports local decision-making - but knows little about the ‘devolution revolution’

Published at 00:03 AM on 30 October 2015

  • Citizens trust local government most to make decisions about local services.
  • But they know little or nothing about the Government’s decentralisation plans.
  • Doubts remain about the potential of the Northern Powerhouse to achieve its goals.
  • Introducing elected mayors makes little difference in the eyes of the public.

The public across the English regions is generally supportive of devolving greater powers to local government, despite acknowledging they know very little about the proposals for devolution.

That’s according to a collaborative study published today [Tuesday 27 October 2015] by Ipsos MORI, the New Local Government Network (NLGN) and PwC.

Despite featuring high on the Westminster agenda - with several proposals under consideration and the Chancellor’s promise at Conservative Party conference of a “devolution revolution” – this is still a relatively unknown concept to the public. Over three-quarters (76%) either know a ‘little’ or ‘nothing’ about proposals to transfer decision making powers from Whitehall to local areas across England.

Awareness of devolution proposals is no greater among those residing in the 38 areas which are currently trying to agree potential deals - only 1 in 5 (21%) know a ‘great deal’ or a ‘fair amount’ about the proposals which are likely to change the way their local public services are delivered.

Commenting on the report and its findings, Jonathan House, Local Government Partner at PwC said:

“These results show there is still work to do around communicating what decentralisation means for citizens but the debate will become more apparent as the focus moves from strategy and planning, to choices on economic growth investment and the implementation of redesigned local services.

“These are the real issues that will make a real difference to the lives of people living in their communities.

“Decentralisation offers the opportunity for local players to take a joined up approach to public service reform, redesigning services around the citizen.

“But there will be difficult decisions ahead and councils need to engage the public in an honest discussion about the future shape of public services."

However, encouragingly the survey found that around half (49%) of all respondents supported the principle of decentralising local decision-making powers over economic development, transport, housing, planning and policing. Only 17% were wholly opposed to devolving these powers.

Support for local decision-making is driven by a belief it will allow local councils and other local agencies to be more flexible in responding to changing local demand (59%) and that local politicians know better than national politicians what is best for their local area (59%).

Nicola Moss, head of Ipsos MORI North said:

“It’s clear that people support greater decentralisation of power but there’s a gap between their understanding of “devolution” - the term wafted around in Whitehall  - and what they want for their own communities.

“In fact, local government has more credibility on local issues, and whilst decentralisation isn’t front of mind for most people, the principle is attractive - particularly when it comes to hyperlocal issues such as planning.”

The key concern for those who do not support devolution is the spectre of the “postcode lottery” - some 58% cited the risk that service provision might vary between areas as a result, whilst a similar proportion (58%) simply don’t trust local politicians to make the right decisions.

Support for local control is highest when it comes to planning housing developments and transport, but the balance tips in the other direction when it comes to benefit payments and large scale infrastructure projects (related to air, rail and road), which most people think should remain under the control of Westminster.

Simon Parker, Director, NLGN said:

“The public clearly supports the principle of the devolution revolution, but that support could curdle if they don’t have a say about the changes taking place in their towns and cities. Both central and local government need to bring this debate out of the backrooms of Whitehall and into the open air of democratic debate.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the study finds that people in the North of England who fall within the catchment of the so-called Northern Powerhouse, have a much higher level of awareness of devolution than throughout the rest of England. They are also the most supportive of the decentralisation process, with over half (53%) backing plans to devolve more decision-making powers around areas like transport, economic development and housing.

However, the research shows that there is still some headway needed to make those in the North more aware of the proposals for devolution. And whilst there is greater support for the principle of devolution, this has not yet translated into confidence in the ambitions of the Northern Powerhouse initiative, with only a quarter of those living in the region optimistic that it can achieve its aims.

The survey also shows that a further third (34%) of the public living in the North are ambivalent towards the Northern Powerhouse - neither optimistic nor pessimistic that its aims will be achieved, which when combined with those who are pessimistic that its aims can be achieved, reflects a majority who remain unconvinced.

Looking to the Government’s proposals for including elected mayors in the decentralisation process, nearly half (45%) of respondents agreed that having a mayor had had a positive impact on London; however, the involvement of an elected Mayor does not make a great deal of difference to whether people support the principle of decentralising powers.

When asked, only 19% said an elected Mayor would make them more supportive of devolution, while 15% said that having an elected mayor would make them less so.

For more information please contact Claire Kennon, media relations, PwC, on 0161 245 2417 / [email protected] 

Notes to editors

  • Ipsos MORI surveyed a representative sample of 3,831 adults aged 16+ across England (including 1,058 in the North). Surveys were conducted online between 18th September and 29th September 2015. Data is weighted to match the profile of the population.

About Ipsos MORI

With offices in 86 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across six research specializations: advertising, customer loyalty, marketing, media, public affairs research, and survey management. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks third in the global research industry.

Ipsos MORI Social Research Institute are methodological and public policy experts. Its North office is based in Manchester and provides a full research service to public sector and business organisations in the North of England. For more information follow us @IpsosMORI North

About PwC

At PwC, our purpose is to build trust in society and solve important problems. We’re a network of firms in 157 countries with more than 208,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in assurance, advisory and tax services. Find out more and tell us what matters to you by visiting us at www.pwc.com.

PwC refers to the PwC network and/or one or more of its member firms, each of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

About NLGN

NLGN is the leading think tank for local government, working with around 30 of the country’s most ambitious councils. Our work has frequently explored the territory between local government and the NHS, including major studies on health and wellbeing boards, the transfer of public health to councils and the broader agenda for integrating health and care services. Please visit www.nlgn.org.uk


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About PwC

At PwC, our purpose is to build trust in society and solve important problems. We’re a network of firms in 157 countries with more than 208,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in assurance, advisory and tax services. Find out more and tell us what matters to you by visiting us at www.pwc.com.

PwC refers to the PwC network and/or one or more of its member firms, each of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details. © 2016 PwC. All rights reserved

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