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As we move rapidly towards the next general election, all eyes are on ideas that will emerge to deliver good growth, reform government and public services and help lift standards of living. Our blog explores the most pressing challenges being faced in the public sector today, towards 2015 and beyond.

30 September 2014

Who really has a good job?

By Nick C Jones Productivity, and its improvement, is the point where the debates on growth, living standards and deficit reduction converge. In the long run, living standards and productivity are closely linked. In the second of our Citizens’ Juries in our 2015 and beyond programme - at the Conservative...

26 September 2014

Where next for decentralisation in England?

By Nick C Jones In the wake of the Scottish vote, the ramifications for Scotland of devo-max are now to the fore. With the West Lothian and related ‘English’ questions now firmly on the agenda, how will the leaders in Westminster take up the challenge of decentralising further power and...

25 September 2014

Labour Party Conference: The public’s view on the poverty premium

By Tina Hallett So at the conclusion of the first of three Citizens’ Juries in our 2015 and beyond programme, at the Labour Party Conference, what was their verdict? The Jury had already given their views on minimum acceptable living standards before we took a deep dive into the critical,...

23 September 2014

The public’s view on living standards

By Nick C Jones It’s political party conference time, and we’ve started the first of our Citizens’ Juries in our 2015 and beyond programme - at the Labour Party’s gathering in Manchester. Rising living costs have climbed up the political agenda, driven by Labour and the responses from other parties...

18 September 2014

Party conference season approaches. Did you know?…

By Rosamund Gentry Party conference season kicks off on Monday. Ahead of this, we’ve compiled 10 facts about the conferences – including what’s particularly significant about this year. 1. Party conferences – do they last for a whole season? It may feel like it to some but party conference season...

12 September 2014

Decentralisation by default

By Nick C Jones and Stephanie Hyde Is decentralisation the answer - both to unleashing the potential of our regions and improving public service outcomes? The answer is an emphatic ‘yes’ according to a report by IPPR which we’ve supported on ‘The Decentralisation Decade’. There are economic problems associated with...

11 September 2014

Procuring with impact

By Tim Pope & James Bowman Charities are accustomed to reporting their administration, governance and fundraising costs, which in an era of openness and transparency have become key indicators of a charity’s effectiveness. Yet there is often another cost, much less reported, that could have an even bigger impact –...

08 September 2014

Bringing the public’s voice to party conference season…

By Tina Hallett We are getting ever closer to the next general election. The start of September, after a long (but not entirely uneventful) holiday season, signals the beginning of the annual political party conference season… This year’s conferences are likely to be particularly high profile, as the last before...

29 August 2014

Employee engagement: mind the gap!

By Ben Jones and Katie Hill Despite encouraging signs of economic recovery, there still remains significant income inequality in society. The minimum wage, and living wage are important levers to address basic pay inequality issues, but wider issues of employee engagement and opportunity also play a part in boosting UK...

22 August 2014

Who’s accountable now?

By Nick C Jones and Stephanie Hyde Decentralisation is firmly in the sights of politicians nationally and locally, but is it really possible for government to ‘let go’ in our centralised political culture? We first investigated this question five years ago, with the think tank IPPR. The original research suggested...