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25 April 2012

UK Information Security Breaches Survey Results 2012

This is the latest of the series of Information Security Breaches Surveys, carried out every couple of years since the early 1990s. Infosecurity Europe carried out the survey, and PwC analysed the results and wrote the report. The department for Business, Innovation and Skills supported the survey.

This year’s results show

  • Security breaches remain at historically high levels, costing UK plc billions of pounds every year.
  • The number of significant hacking attacks on large organisations has doubled over the last two years.
  • Most serious breaches result from failings in a combination of people, process and technology; it’s important to invest in all three aspects.
  • Organisations are struggling to target their security expenditure. The key challenge is to evaluate and communicate the business benefits from investing in security controls.
  • The cost of dealing with breaches and of the knee-jerk responses afterwards usually outweighs the cost of prevention.
  • Social networks are growing in importance to business, and companies are rapidly opening up their systems to smart phones and tablets. Security controls are lagging behind the rate of technology adoption.
  • Unsurprisingly, most respondents expect the number of security breaches to increase in the future.

You can download the full technical report and a two page executive summary, using the links below:

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