Introduction of part-time student work permits in the UAE

01 November 2016

The Dubai Creative Clusters Authority (DCCA) has introduced part-time work permit facilities for students. The new regulation allows students who are enrolled in full time undergraduate, graduate, or post graduate programs with an academic institution operating within DCCA (including Knowledge Village) to engage in part-time work for other companies operating within the Freezone. 

Eligible students must be at least 18 years old and should be sponsored by an academic institution where they have completed at least one year of full time study and maintain a prescribed Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) that is approved by the Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA). In addition, students may also be required to present written consent from their parent/guardian as well as a valid health insurance policy in order to obtain a part-time work permit. Such work permits must be applied for by the academic institution itself and once the application is approved, the employing entity must apply for Student ID card through their online immigration portal.  

The DCCA’s decision to introduce part-time work permits for students is in line with the Ministry of Human Resources and Emiratisation’s (MOHRE’s) earlier announcement to implement training and temporary work permits for students and young people between the ages of 12 and 18 years for entities based in mainland/onshore. Although the UAE’s Labour Law had already made provisions for such part-time permits, formal implementation has been varied. It should be noted that companies operating in certain business sectors that are deemed high-risk or hazardous may not be eligible to employ young people on a part-time or full-time basis.  

What this means for you as an employer? 

This new development will be beneficial to companies operating within the DCCA who also intend to hire students for part-time projects, internships, or even training programs. Companies would, however, have to adhere to regulations governing working hours, rest periods, and the work place environment in general.

 

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